Sunday, April 19, 2009

Going...Going...

I received a phone call about the Troop barn this afternoon. I have been expecting a phone call about this octagonal barn for some time. The call I was expecting was going to tell me that the building had fallen down. In a perfect world, the phone call was going to tell me that someone had purchased the property and they were going to restore the building. I was not expecting a call to tell me that the building was being torn down.

This is why heritage designation is important. This building has recently been deregistered by the County as well as the Province. As such, there was absolutely no protection for it. While designation does provide some protection, the other side of the equation is that buildings need to be maintained. This building was not being maintained.

I have heard (second hand information) that the framework is to be disassembled and taken to somewhere on the South Shore of the province. I do not know if this is true. Unfortunately, the importance of the barn is its context. It was built in Granville Center. Since 1888 this building has graced the landscape in this community. Generations of the Troop family have used this barn while toiling to make a living off the land in the Annapolis Valley. While its history tells an international story, Its individual story and its human connections are here. Reassembled elsewhere, the barn is a hollow shell devoid of its history.

Perhaps a new start is the best thing for the Troop Barn. Despite a great deal of effort and endless discussions, there did not seem to be anyone locally who was willing to step in to save the building. This is a better option than having the barn collapse. Emotionally, this does not feel like a better option. To say that I am crestfallen to see this barn being taken down is an understatement. This is another lost piece of our heritage.

All for now,
RGS

6 comments:

  1. How sad! While it was getting pretty dilapidated, it still had a "feel" to it of bygone times when someone had a real sense of style. Unfortunately, it all cost money these days.

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  2. So disappointing :-(

    Bill and I were just talking about this the other day hoping that the new buyers would restore it.

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  3. Strangely, I seem to have been going through the stages of mourning about the loss of the barn. I think that I have hit acceptance at this point. I have been out a few times to take pictures of the stages of the barn coming down. I still wish that something would have worked to keep the barn in this community. As Anne said, everything costs money.
    RGS

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  4. When I read the notice of application for decertification in the Spectator I knew this would be the end result. It is truly sad. This building was a community landmark. Do a quick google search and you'll be amazed by the number of photos of the barn that come up. I gave serious thought to purchasing the property, but the $50,000 asking price for three acres of land, a dilapidated house and falling down barn simply did not make financial sense. As much as I love old barns and want to see our heritage protected I could not justify such an outrageous sum (and my wife would have none of it). As for the rumour of the barn being reassembled on the South Shore, I would be shocked if it were true. More likely the timbers have been sold to a company on the South Shore. - Paul

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  5. My dad grew up there he is Walter TROOP I was going to buy it until I saw the price.He told me she need to much work to fix up. I am sad to see her being tore down I had some fun in there. David Troop.

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  6. The demise of the Troop Barn brings tears to my eyes for sure!

    The landscape in Granville Center is certainly not the same without it.

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