Wednesday, November 25, 2009

All Saints Anglican - part 5

Well, the frame of All Saints Anglican Church in Granville Centre did not come down as quickly as I thought that it would. Because of this, I was able to get a few more pictures. While I would jokingly like to say that this is a testament to the quality of the construction, I imagine that it has more to do with the size of the project. Mind you, I will take nothing away from the quality of All Saints' timber frame construction. The nature of this style of framing made it an excellent candidate to move and reassemble.

The dismantling of this church has been an interesting, if somewhat distressing, process. I am sure that those of us on both sides of the discussion have gone through a varied series of emotions. It continues to be my fervent hope that the loss of this structure will act as a wake up call to those of us interested in preserving the architectural heritage of our country. This should also act as a reminder to those of us (I am including myself) who are currently the stewards of heritage structures. In many cases there are people who are willing to help find alternatives to displacement or destruction. While there is no hope that we will save every building, we are short changing ourselves and future generations if we do not make an attempt to preserve our built heritage.

All for now,
RGS



2 comments:

  1. WE WELCOME YOUR CULTURAL HERITAGE ARTIFACT TO OUR SMALL TOWN. MANY OF THE AREAS RESIDENTS HAVE ROOTS IN YOUR HISTORY. THE CAJUNS WERE A DISPLACED PEOPLES THAT RELOCATED TO OUR STATE.

    SCOTT PICKENS
    ABITA SPRINGS
    LOUISIANA USA

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  2. Scott, I hope you enjoy the building. There is no doubt in my mind, however, that All Saints should have remained in Granville Centre, the only place where it can have genuine roots and meaning. The truth is, the Cajuns/Acadians have absolutely no connection to All Saints whatsoever - it was built 59 years after the Acadians were expelled, and was for a different denomination (Church of England). The man at whose behest it was built, Bishop Charles Inglis, was a Loyalist for whom loyalty to the crown and loyalty to the Established Church were synonymous. That is the story that All Saints tells - not the story of the Acadians, or of the baptists of Louisiana. In fact, if you had any idea just how hard Bishop Inglis tried to make sure his churches did NOT look Baptist, buying the building might not seem like such a great idea after all.

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